The Beach Boys - All Summer Long mp3 album

50:34
The Beach Boys - All Summer Long mp3 album
AM Pop,Early Pop/Rock,Rock & Roll,Contemporary Pop/Rock,Surf,Sunshine Pop
  • Performer:
    The Beach Boys
  • Title:
    All Summer Long
  • Genre:
  • Style:
    AM Pop,Early Pop/Rock,Rock & Roll,Contemporary Pop/Rock,Surf,Sunshine Pop
  • Duration:
    50:34
The Beach Boys - All Summer Long mp3 album

  • Size FLAC version
    1325 mb
  • Size MP3 version
    1919 mb
  • Size WMA version
    1418 mb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    477
  • Formats:
    MP1 AHX MIDI VQF VOC AA

Track List

Title/Composer Performer Time
1 I Get Around Mike Love / Brian Wilson The Beach Boys 2:14
2 All Summer Long Mike Love / Brian Wilson The Beach Boys 2:08
3 Hushabye Doc Pomus / M. Schuman The Beach Boys 2:41
4 Little Honda Mike Love / Brian Wilson The Beach Boys 1:52
5 We'll Run Away G. Usher / Brian Wilson The Beach Boys 2:02
6 Carl's Big Chance Brian Wilson / C. Wilson The Beach Boys 2:03
7 Wendy Mike Love / Brian Wilson The Beach Boys 2:21
8 Do You Remember? Mike Love / Brian Wilson The Beach Boys 1:40
9 Girls on the Beach Brian Wilson The Beach Boys 2:28
10 Drive-In Mike Love / Brian Wilson The Beach Boys 1:49
11 Our Favorite Recording Sessions Brian Wilson / C. Wilson / D. Wilson The Beach Boys 2:00
12 Don't Back Down Mike Love / Brian Wilson The Beach Boys 1:52
13 I Get Around Mike Love / Brian Wilson The Beach Boys 2:14
14 All Summer Long [Stereo] Mike Love / Brian Wilson The Beach Boys 2:08
15 Hushabye [Stereo] Doc Pomus / M. Schuman The Beach Boys 2:42
16 Little Honda [Stereo] Mike Love / Brian Wilson The Beach Boys 1:54
17 We'll Run Away [Stereo] G. Usher / Brian Wilson The Beach Boys 2:02
18 Carl's Big Chance [Stereo] Brian Wilson / C. Wilson The Beach Boys 2:27
19 Wendy [Stereo] Mike Love / Brian Wilson The Beach Boys 2:18
20 Do You Remember? [Stereo] Mike Love / Brian Wilson The Beach Boys 1:40
21 Girls on the Beach [Stereo] Brian Wilson The Beach Boys 2:26
22 Drive-In [Stereo] Mike Love / Brian Wilson The Beach Boys 1:51
23 Our Favorite Recording Sessions [Stereo] Brian Wilson / C. Wilson / D. Wilson The Beach Boys 1:59
24 Don't Back Down [Stereo] Mike Love / Brian Wilson The Beach Boys 1:43

Credits

The Beach Boys - Primary Artist
Alan Boyd - Producer
Derry Fitzgerald - Mixing
Mark Linett - Mastering, Mixing, Producer, Supervisor
Mike Love - Composer
Doc Pomus - Composer
M. Schuman - Composer
G. Usher - Composer
Brian Wilson - Composer, Original Recording Producer
C. Wilson - Composer
D. Wilson - Composer
Dennis Wolfe - Producer



Winail
Rating: A-Prior Beach Boys albums all had great songs but this is their first consistently stellar album, as the arrival of The Beatles spurred Brian to up his game. Simply put, this is the quintessential early (pre-'65) Beach Boys album and it epitomizes their appeal, with songs about surfer studs, gorgeous gals, endlessly beautiful southern California summers, fast humming hot rods, and teenage romance. A first-rate summer album for non-cynics that perfectly evokes a more innocent time and closes their early surf and cars era - the era and sound that most casual fans tend to think of, as opposed to music critics and hardcore music geeks - this album is also notable for its more sophisticated sound, as Brian incorporates more instruments and increasingly elaborate arrangements. This album has an excellent mix of fun rock 'n' roll and their trademark lovely ballads, with a minimum of filler in the form of the group's last surf instrumental (the actually pretty good "Carl's Big Chance") and another should've remained in the vaults curiosity ("Our Favorite Recording Sessions," though unlike "'Cassius'" from the previous album at least this one is sequenced towards the end of the album). Obviously the classic from this album, the band's first #1 hit and one of their greatest singles, is "I Get Around," which expertly contrasts Mike's reedy rock vocals with the band's trademark harmonies on the chorus and some of Brian's most fabulous falsettos. The musically expansive "All Summer Long" also has excellent lyrics and delivers pure summer goodness, while their lullaby-like cover of The Mystics "Hushabye" is a great example of the group's increasingly intricate vocal arrangements. The energetic "Little Honda," soon a top 10 hit for the Hondells and later covered by Yo La Tengo, was ahead of its time with its innovative use of fuzz tone, plus it's catchy as all get out and is simply one of their best rockers (and one of their best car songs), while "We'll Run Away" and the doo-wop flavored "Wendy" are terrific teenage romance ballads with a more somber, serious tone than most of the rest of the material here. "Girls On The Beach" is another strong ballad even if it's overly imitative of "Surfer Girl," while "Do You Remember" is a nostalgic rock 'n' roller (notable given that the group would later become America's #1 nostalgia driven "oldies act") that's minor but fun, though some have taken issue with certain inaccuracies in the lyrics (lighten up people). I'd describe "Drive-In" similarly (minor but fun), while "Don't Back Down" fittingly delivers one of their finest surf songs, providing a good time finale to both the album and that era the band.
Winn
While the previous album, "Shut Down Volume 2", was the first album after the start of the British Invasion, this album is the first direct answer to it by Brian Wilson. And the first thing you'll notice, listening to Beach Boys' albums in chronological order, is the immediate boost in quality of the songs from start to finish. This makes "All Summer Long" the band's first complete album.This is also the first album that mostly eschews the surfing and cars themes, shifting it's lyrical content to the overall west coast teenage experience. "I Get Around" starts the album off with a bang, and it's their first #1 hit. And there's a huge gold mine of deep cuts here this time around. Notable standouts include the title track, "Wendy", "Girls on the Beach", "Little Honda", "Don't Back Down", and a fantastic reverential cover of "Hushabye." The pressures of being head Beach Boy would soon take its toll on Brian, who would have a breakdown by the end of the year, making this the last studio album released by the band's current configuration (other than the Christmas album). But the groundwork was being laid for the next phase in the group's career; a phase that would put them among the best ever in short order.
Shan
The development from "Surfer Girl" to "All Summer Long" is stunning, comparable from the improvement from "Surfin’ USA" to "Surfer Girl". It’s hard for an album to maintain the quality when starting with “I Get Around”, one of the greatest pop songs ever recorded, but “Don’t Back Down” and “Be True To Your School” manage to keep the quality stunningly high, “Little Honda” is a great little Rock’n’Roll track, while “We’ll Run Away” and “Girls on The Beach” are stunning. However it is harmonies on “Hushabye” that really take the breath away, especially when Mike’s vocals kick in.
Frdi
Best early album of the Beach Boys...very fun rocking and melodic...and enjoyable...they are still a band here and this is their best as a BAND in the true sense of the word Oh,and the search of perfection of the ''Pet Sounds'' reviewers is annoying...sorry
Ylal
Great album. One of their best. Equal or maybe better than Beatles' Hard Days Night. You can soon tell the Beatles were taking Wilson's idea of great harmonies and applying it to their own music with songs like Hushabye and especially We'll Run Away. Until I listened to the Beach Boys, I used to think the Beatles were very original. Now I realize they copied some of their good stuff from the Beach Boys.
Mr.Champions
I have a hunch there's some growth going on here. Then again, I have to think about it, which probably means there really isn't any. I will say that while the filler is really offensive ('Our Favorite Recording Sessions' is like ''Cassius Love Vs. Sonny Wilson' except they don't even make an attempt to be funny, or surprising, or anything but absolutely clumsy and irritating), there's considerably less of it than we've seen. I still think that Brian could've done better with his consistency than he has, but mostly I just feel he's cut the level of crap to a more manageable level. It's got the fantastic 'I Get Around' I already mentioned (the Beach Boys catalogue has the most overlap between albums outside of some soul acts...James Brown must've put different versions of 'Please Please Please' on over a dozen releases over the years, and that's not an exaggeration) as well as the short, nostalgic title track that somehow captures the waning days of summer and the creeping depression of an oncoming fall like few other songs (hell...when I was in St. Petersburg, as soon as the sun started going down earlier than 8 pm I thought life was about to come to an end because the winter there was like a trip to the Gulag). Lesser known hits like 'Hushabye' (pretty, but not as good as the likes of the highly like-minded 'Don't Worry Baby'), 'Little Honda' (despite essentially being a Honda motorbike commercial and having one of the more mindless choruses in the band's history), and the goddamn-cheating-cunt breakup song 'Wendy', and the chancey surf anthem 'Don't Back Down' also contribute to a sense of quality on this record. Brian's slowly but surely expanding his palatte of chord sequences (there's nothing here that much resembles Chuck Berry, for example) and fresh vocal harmonies
Wenes
A classic, full of great rockers and more sophisticated than earlier efforts. Brian is still doing some car songs, including well-deserved hits like "I Get Around," with its famous a capella intro, and the slightly more primitive, but equally exciting "Little Honda." There's also the occasional churning surf rocker, like the haunting, angst-ridden "Don't Back Down" - but even that stuff is really solid. He's also moving in a more sophisticated, introspective direction, with increasingly complex arrangements and incredibly rich harmonies: the title track; "Hushabye"; the fantastic, up-tempo love song "Wendy"; Brian's sincere falsetto lead on the silly teen drama "We'll Run Away"; and "Girls On The Beach," whose modulations and harmony are so intricate it's literally confusing. Unfortunately, the few low points are truly low, with unlistenable lyrics that Mike Love recently convinced a jury were all his fault (topical 50's throwbacks like "Drive-In" and the pathetic high school nostalgia piece "Do You Remember"). There's also a bogus "bonus" track consisting of aimless, spliced-together studio chatter ("Our Favorite Recording Sessions").
Yozshubei
(Very Good)Best song: I Get AroundIn some ways, this album isn't really that different from all of the frustrating Beach Boys albums that came before. It's only 12 tracks and 25 minutes long; one of the tracks is a "comedic" look behind the scenes at the process of recording ("Our Favorite Recording Sessions")); and the lyrics are still largely centered around lightweight and fluffy topics even by the standards of 1964. And yet, while this album may resemble what had come before it in form, it most certainly does not resemble what had come before it in content. For the first time, the band seems to be making a conscious break from the "two hits and a bunch of leftovers so we can get it out the door quickly" model that had been the standard prior to the British Invasion. I wouldn't quite say that every track is great (even putting aside "Our Favorite Recording Sessions"), but I would say that every track sounds like it received a sufficient level of attention and care, and it's just really nice to have an early Beach Boys album that doesn't seem to have relatively long stretches without interesting material. Also, while the lyrics are still firmly on the "lightweight" side of things, they've made a shift that I feel is strongly to the album's benefit; rather than the band's previous myopic focus on surfing or cars, this album's lyrics center around a more universally appreciated topic, the joys of being young and carefree during a warm summer, and it's largely because of this that I find that I can connect with this album more easily than I could with good chunks of the earlier ones.